Tag Archive: bands

  1. An Introduction to the Music Industry – Part 1

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    The music industry can be a mysterious place. It’s important to what what each area of the industry does and how you can earn a living.

    An Introduction to the Music Industry - Part 1

    Intellectual Property

    Intellectual property is based around Copyright. Copyright is present in all forms of intellectual property, from film to music to journalism. Although the specifics can vary from country to country,  usually the creator owns all the rights. Unless the creator is employed to create something, in which, the employing company would own the rights. In each creative industry, especially the music industry, there are many rights that can be owned by different parties (the artist, songwriter, record label etc.).

    There are several rights involved in a singular release (single, E.P., Album). Here is an explanation to what they grant the rights to and who would own these rights:

    • Song Rights: Covers Musical Composition, Lyrics, Performance rights and Publishing Rights (mechanical rights, print rights, synchronisation rights).

    Often owned by the artist or the band. These rights can often be split amongst band music partners, i.e. Elton John (composer) and Bernie Taupin (lyricist), or have joint owners amongst a band, i.e. John Lennon and Paul McCartney.

    • Recording Rights: Covers Recorded Rights, Mastering Rights and Music Videos.

    Often owned by whoever pays for these services, i.e. the record label.

    • Artistic Rights: Covers Artwork and Photography.

    Often owned by the artist or photographer who creates/takes these.

    Making Money and Licensing

    If you own all the rights on a song (excluding artistic rights), you can control:

    • Re-production = re-recording your music.
    • Distribution = distributing your music to stores and streaming platforms.
    • Public Performance = your music being played publicly.
    • Adaption
    • Communication/Broadcasting = your music being played on radio
    • Synchronisation = your music being in film, TV, video games, advertisements and other forms of visual media.

    As the rights holder, you make money by Licensing these. Licensing means giving permission to others to use your property, and so as an artist, songwriter, record label etc. you can sell licenses (permission) for the above actions to other artists and industry members.

    NOTE: Copyright does not last forever i.e. in the UK copyright for recording rights last 70 years, becoming public domain afterwards. However, owners of these rights have found ways to renew these rights. For instance, as the recording rights for specific songs have started to run out, record labels have begun re-releasing music to renew the recording rights (which will last for another 70 years in the UK).

    Trademark

    People often get Trademark and Copyright mixed up, however unlike Copyright (which is automatically in place), to trademark something registration is required.

    There is no copyright in the name of an artist or band, however artists and bands can register their names for trademark (requesting which sector you are protected, i.e. Oasis – Band, Oasis – drink and Oasis – clothes retailer). Artists who trademark their name in entertainment can license their name to fashion, perfume, beer etc. For artists that reach a certain level of ‘success’, a lot of money can be made from trademark licensing.

    Artists and Bands may look to have the following trademarked:

    • Names
    • Logos
    • Slogans

    NOTE: Certain words cannot be trademarked, for example: swear words, key religious figures, city names.

  2. 8 Tips to Get Your Music Heard

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    There are many ways in which you can get your music heard. This can be achieved through CD’s, radio, TV and many online distributors. Your music can be uploaded to different online platforms free of charge such as YouTube, Soundcloud and Vimeo. However getting your music heard through the mass amounts of bands and artists that are also online is more challenging. The likes of social media, radio and live streaming are useful to reach your target audience and keep followers updated.

    Get your music heard on social media through ad campaigns; prices for this will vary depending on which social media site you wish to advertise on. However, this will be seen by more people which will let your name and music to be known. Another option for getting your music heard online is through self-promotion, though this may more time consuming.

    Get Your Music Heard

    Get Your Music Heard Online

    Here are some few tip to help make your music heard through the noise of the online community.

    1. Keep track of trends on social media so you’re relatable to your target audience. Using trends will also mean your name and music are seen by more people.

    2. Collaborating with an artist that creates similar music in the same genre, will let you grow your fan base.

    3. Ensure all the songs you upload have the appropriate tags that relate to your music. This will allow people to find your content easily. It will also allow people who like your genre of music to find your songs more easily.

    4. Post regularly to each of your your social media platforms. This keeps your audience engaged and also helps you gain more followers. You can also let your followers know that you’re creating new music and keep them up to date with your live dates.

    5. Create a hype prior to the release of a single or album. You can do this through a countdown to the release date and posting album art or snippets of a music video etc.

    6. Competitions to win merchandise, tickets or songs etc, allows you to gain more interest for your music. Try asking people to like and share your content, for a chance to win and creating more interest and grow your fan base at the same time.

    7. Contact online radio, traditional radio or university radio stations etc. to play your music. Ensure all songs are edited for radio, meaning no swearing or offensive content is included. Radio campaigns are also effective if you wish your music to be promoted further.

    8. Live streams mean people can listen to you or your band play live, giving them a more personal performance. Live streaming will also allow people to hear your music instantly and allow them to give you feedback. Remember to post on your social media platforms prior to ensure people know that you’re doing a live-stream.

    Online promotion is key to get your music heard. Social media, live steaming and radio channels are popular and can be low cost options to get your music in front of a larger audience.

  3. Marketing in the Streaming Age

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    Cutting through the noise has always been a problem when trying to promote and market your music. The questions has always been how to influence the public and get your music out there and seen by them. When it comes to marketing in the streaming age, we have to re-evaluate how we market music.

    Marketing in the Streaming Age

     

    Let’s Fix Music Marketing

    The biggest problem with marketing now is that what we have always considered to be the best practices for marketing music no longer apply to streaming.

    The way unit sales and fans work together has drastically changed. We never had to understand fans in the way that we do now.

    Before streaming, 1 fan meant 1 sale / one-off transaction. The economic value of each fan was the same.

    After streaming, 1 fan can mean multiple plays over a long period of time. The economic value of each fan is variable.

    With this in mind, our marketing objectives need to change. Previously, the objective was to simply “get more fans”. Now the objective needs to be “get more fans and keep them engaged.”

    The best way to do this is to create long term commitments that are focused on audience development and engagement. You can create different engagement points for fans that build interest over time. This can be anything from single releases, live sessions, videos, appearances, album releases etc. Remember that varied content is key in driving engagement.

    Don’t write off traditional marketing strategies altogether though, it still works as a great tool for discovery, but try to place more emphasis on engagement.

    Artist Marketing in the Streaming Age

    Playlisting is one of the most powerful tools we have at our disposal when marketing in the streaming age. Adding a song to a playlist will help others to discover it and could persuade them to add it to their own playlists. Music needs to be nurtured if it is to survive and this works even better if you can create a narrative around a playlist.

    Take the time to understand yourself as an artist. This may sound strange, but once you fully understand what you stand for and what you are trying to achieve you will find it easier to know where to promote yourself. Get to know your fans too, know your demographic and what they’re into and move forward from there.

    Think long term. Always think about what you can do next once you are done with your current release / event etc. What will you do after your album has been released? You can create interactive videos that come months after the album has been released etc. Look at each project individually and come up with creative ways to communicate what you have to offer. You need to have the building blocks that create a story for your fans to follow, but don’t bombard them. Do you best to plan ahead and have a trick up your sleeve, think of what you can be doing in 6 months time.

    Traditional media and printed press always want to focus around a release and this thinking needs to change. We can already see this taking place with digital media with this article discussing Shakira’s new music video. Don’t get me wrong, traditional plans that are built around a release are still needed. After all, the major labels have helped to build a hit-based society, and so that is what audiences expect.

    Content needs to feed on to each other. If you announce a tour without any new material you will get much less engagement and press coverage than you would if you also had new music to accompany it.

    Streaming provides a wealth of data and a sizeable audience that cannot be ignored. Data allows you to discover new fan bases and what they are in to. You can also find where they are located what other artist they are into. This can be very useful information when looking to plan a tour. Everyone, no matter how big or small, has something to gain from understanding data. Be prepared to change your approach based on what you see in your data too. Spotify Artists can be a great place to start.

    Traditional vs New Marketing

    Traditional marketing tactics are not completely dead, you simply need to incorporate them with new ideas. Marketing in the streaming age has changed and the objective has shifted. Learn to adapt to stay ahead and cut through the noise above your competitors.

    To do this, communicate better with your audience and learn to work as a team. Focus on serving your fans for a long term reward, it is an investment in your future. Don’t stand in the way of your releases, share them when they’re ready and plan what you can do to maximise them and to follow up. Don’t lose the momentum you build.