Tag Archive: British Recording Industry

  1. How Important Are Streaming Playlists?

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    You can have a successful marketing campaign without playlist support from streaming platforms, but it is definitely something you should consider as a marketing tool for your next release. As more and more people turn to streaming as their primary source of music listening, applying techniques that relate to these platforms can certainly help boost your reach.

    How Important Are Streaming Playlists?

    How Many People Actually Listen To Playlists?

    Before considering whether playlists are right for you, it’s important to understand how many people actually engage with playlists rather than going direct to the single, album or EP that is available.

    Kobalt Music Group (one of the largest independent music service providers in the industry) says that about 10% of streaming plays come from playlists – therefore, perhaps basing a campaign around specific services’ playlists isn’t a great long-term strategy. This is because once the music comes off the playlists you have nothing left and you are potentially only appealing to 10% of your listening audience.

    If you want to get your music onto playlists you should be mixing this with other techniques that can reach other sectors of your audience.

    What Playlists Are The Most Important?

    The answer to this question totally depends on what music you are making. Perhaps the most well-known playlists are the ‘New Music Friday’ playlists. However, the tracks on these playlists burn fast – they are constantly changing. It may be considered a high-profile playlist, but if you are considering using playlists as part of your marketing campaign then it is perhaps more beneficial to be on a more specialised playlist with less followers as this may have more engagement.

    You should define what genre of music you make and then search for playlists that are created around this type of music. Follow them for a few weeks and get to know how often the tracks are changed around. This will tell you which playlists will give you the most coverage. It’s not just about how many followers it has – a playlist could have tens of thousands of followers, but if your track is only on there for a few days then this won’t give you as much exposure as a playlist that has a couple thousand followers but gives you weeks of coverage.

    How Do I Get Playlisted?

    On sites like YouTube where there’s a user-upload system, you don’t need to engage the actual platform, just the person who is making the playlists. This can often be quite easy – most people have some sort of contact details on their channel / profile or there is a messaging system embedded into the platform. Again, find out what each playlist curator usually includes and tell them why your track would fit with that playlist.

    If you are going for the big-guns like Apple Music, Spotify, Deezer etc. then the chances are you may already be using a distributor to get your music on that platform in the first place. Some of these distributors have great relationships in place with these platforms already, and can help you get onto various playlists through their own in-house marketing packages.

    What Can I Do Myself To Boost My Marketing Efforts?

    When it comes to playlisting, you don’t have to always rely on other people to include you in their playlists to help with your marketing campaign – create your own! If you’ve got a new track you want to tell people about and link people to in your website / social media announcements, first create a playlist that has your promoted track first on the list, followed by some of your other material. For example, after someone has watched a video on YouTube it automatically starts playing content from other channels.

    If you link people to your own playlist on YouTube then it keeps people on your own content. Similarly with Spotify or Apple Music – yes, you want to be promoting that specific track, but you should also be getting people hooked on you as an artist! Why not point them in the direction of more of your content? Linking people to playlists you’ve made of your own music can do this.

    Playlists are certainly important in a marketing campaign but are not the be-all and end-all of one. It’s all about analysing your own music and figuring out what playlists and what other strategies are best for the genre of music you create and for the audience you are trying to promote to.

  2. Horus Music Wins Queen’s Award for Enterprise

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    Horus Music wins Queen's Award

    We are delighted to announce that Horus Music has been awarded the Queen’s Award for Enterprise for International Trade.

    Established in 2006, Horus Music is a global music distribution and label services company. Having initially focused on management they now offer musicians a simple and affordable solution to distribute their music and videos. Horus Music now works with over 800 music download and streaming platforms in order to provide as many opportunities as possible for musicians to earn an income from their music, while retaining full control and ownership of their music at all times.

    The company works closely with their clients to empower them with the knowledge and opportunities they need to maximise the value of their music. Horus Music is dedicated to not only  working with one multi-national company but also has partnerships with smaller, more local platforms too. Beyond this, they have opened up more possibilities for their clients by allowing them to infiltrate into massive markets with untapped potential. Within the last three years, Horus Music’s overseas sales have grown by over 180% and staff numbers have tripled.

    On hearing the news, CEO Nick Dunn added: “We are absolutely overjoyed at being recognised by Her Majesty The Queen for outstanding growth in international trade. As a company that has been built without investment from outside sources, along with the hard work and dedication of our team, this award celebrates all that we have achieved. Over the course of our history, we have diligently built an extensive network that allows everybody to achieve and to reach audiences around the world that they wouldn’t ordinarily be able to access. This awards puts us among a small group of companies within the UK to be awarded Britain’s most coveted commercial prize.”

    Director of Horus Music, Nina Condron stated: “The multiculturalism of Leicester has inspired us to ensure that Horus Music doesn’t have solely a western focus, unlike other companies. Our independent spirit motivates us to  provide each of our clients with equal opportunities for distribution and marketing.”

    Having recently opened another office in India designed to improve access to localised platforms and to offer a more personalised service to local musicians, Horus Music is already looking to do the same in even more territories.

    Ian Harrison, Director of Exports in the Midlands for the Department of International Trade said, “We are thrilled to hear that Horus Music has received the Queen’s Award for Enterprise in the International Trade category. This is richly deserved for a company that was incorporated as recently as 2006 but has grown sales both domestically and overseas year on year since then. With a commitment to put the musicians it serves at the heart of its strategy, we wish Horus Music every success in the coming years and will be delighted to continue our close working relationship with the company.”

    Emmy Buckingham, International + Membership Manager for AIM said, “AIM is committed to helping our members’ export activities and Horus Music are a brilliant example of a UK music company maximising their international opportunities to the full extent. Congratulations on receiving the Queen’s Award for Enterprise.”

    Geoff Taylor, Chief Executive BPI & BRIT Awards, said “We’re delighted that our member Horus Music has been honoured with the prestigious Queen’s Award for Enterprise for International Trade. We congratulate Nick Dunn and his team on their singular achievement and on this deserved acknowledgment of their success, recognising that small and independent music companies like Horus Music play their full part in underpinning the appeal of British music around the world, and in driving the UK’s global music exports.”

    Horus Music Ltd. wins the Queen’s Award for International Trade for Outstanding Short Term Growth.

  3. An Introduction to the Music Industry – Part 2

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    Catch up on part 1 here and find out how you can make money from the rights you own.

    An Introduction to the Music Industry - Part 2

    Live Performance

    Unlike copyright, which can be harder to understand, the are two other forms of revenue streams that artists will use. These two forms of making money are Live Performance and Fan Relationship.

    To make money from Live Performance is to simply monetise live performances in front of people. However, ticket income is not the only stream of revenue within the live performance setting, for instance money can be made from:

    • Tickets
    • Ticket commissions
    • Ticket resale mark-ups
    • Food and drink
    • Other services – i.e. cloak room, parking, VIP.
    • Sponsorships – the live sector has the most revenue wth brands (i.e. O2, branded beers at gigs).

    As a an artist’s fan base grows and have greater success and exposure, the live setting will change (naturally getting bigger). Here are the steps that most artists and bands traditionally follow as their live setting changes:

    1. Self promoted gigs, pay to play.
    2. ‘Gig’ or ‘Club’ nights, festival new bands stages.
    3. Club and pub venue touring, festival stages.
    4. Theatre venue, festival main stages – this is the stage where artists will start to make ‘real’ money.
    5. Arena touring, potentially headline slots at festivals
    6. Stadium touring, headlining festivals.

    Fan Relationship

    In the digital age, as record sales diminish and the popularity of streaming services have drastically increased, using a fanbase as a source of revenue has become a major focus for new bands and artists. With the use of social media, artists now have a way of communicating with their fanbase and to get to know them better. This means that artists can find out what the core fans want, and consequently, can find out what to sell to them.

    As an artist, once you have an engaged, growing fanbase, you can start to sell them products and services, such as:

    • A subscription service (i.e. an online fan club)
    • Signed records
    • Deluxe records (with extra content such as, B-sides, demos, acoustic versions etc.)
    • Premium merchandise

    Using the combination of you (the artist), your music and your live shows, you can sell content, experiences and a relationship to your fanbase. In addition, if a sizeable fanbase is created, brands and companies may want to start a partnership with the artistic order to reach that audience, as well as exposing you to their customers.

    These three revenue streams are all built on and rely upon building a group of core fans. To provide them with content, different experiences and an ongoing, engaging relationship, artists will usually have to depend on creating partnerships with other roles within the music industry.