Tag Archive: music industry

  1. How to Pitch your Music to Influencers

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    So, you’ve got some killer tracks laid down in the studio and produced by a top quality engineer. You’ve been gigging regularly and have built up a respectable fanbase on your social media pages too. You’re looking to take the next step and get a manager, label deal and maybe a publisher too.  Essentially, you’re ready to take the next step and pitch your music to influencers.

    How to Pitch your Music to Influencers

    Pitch your Music to Influencers in Person 

    Where do you start? In the music industry, relationships are key. As a musician it’s very important that you’re out there meeting people and making the right contacts for your music. Go to industry events and work the room! Don’t accost every person there with your CD’s, USB’s etc. straight away, but if they ask for music be prepared to be able to provide it. Have some CD’s handy in case this is their preferred method, or get contact details and follow up with links to your music. That last point is especially important – contact details!

    Make sure you have business cards of everyone you’ve spoken to. If they don’t have any ask them to write it in your phone or in a notebook for you. It’s good to also have a business card or leaflet for yourself to give to any contacts you meet; it serves as a little reminder. In these situations, remember to be polite and also concise. Have an elevator pitch about your music ready in order to summarise what you do and who you sound like.

    Pitch your Music to Influencers Online

    Check the websites of the types of company you’re looking to get a deal with. Take a look over their roster and see whether they tend to sign similar sounding artists to you. Does it say that they are accepting submissions? Great! Now, are there specific guidelines to submit music? If yes, even better but make sure you follow them! If you don’t, the harsh truth is that your submission will end up in the trash or at the bottom of their to-do list.

    Some things to look out for:

    • Do they accept physical CD’s in the mail or digital only submissions?
    • Do they want a bio?
    • Do they ask about your social media stats or links to these pages?
    • Who is the right person to send your submission to? Check for an email address or office address in the case of sending a CD – if it’s not clear then give them a call.

    If there aren’t any specific guidelines, it can be a little more tricky. But if you remember to be professional and succinct (without being too vague!) you’ll stand in good stead. There are no hard and fast rules as all companies like to receive music in different ways. Tools like SoundCloud and file sharing sites, like Dropbox and Box are a great way to send music. This way influencers can stream tracks before downloading them.

    General Tips When Sending Emails

    • Make sure you open and sign off your email politely and professionally. Don’t just email a link to your music without at least saying hi and signing off with your name and contact details.
    • Absolutely do not email every company in one mass email. Ever. No excuses.
    • The follow up. This is key, but please give people time to respond. Don’t call them the minute their office opens when you emailed them at 9pm the night before. And don’t be too persistent. They will get back to you, you don’t need to contact them every day to see whether they’ve listened to your tracks. If after a few weeks you haven’t heard a response, this is a good time to check in again.

    Best of luck!

     

  2. Horus Music welcomes PPL and PRS for Music move

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    PRS and PPL Leicester move

    Earlier this week it was announced that Phonographic Performance Limited (PPL) and PRS for Music will be moving their national headquarters from London to Leicester city centre.

    Their new joint venture will begin around July 2017 and will be based in Mercury Place.

    Here at Horus Music we are very excited about this move to join us in Leicester. This has been our home for almost 10 years now and amongst the vibrant music that is played here we enjoy the Midland Mainline service meaning it takes us less than an hour to get into London city centre; less time than many those that are based around London itself.

    We have been partners with both PRS for Music and PPL for many years, and we have seen the benefits that their service provides to our many independent artists and record label clients, which includes the licensing of musical composition and lyrics on behalf of songwriters, composers and publishers as well as the licensing of recorded music for record companies and performers which is played in public or in digital media.

    CEO and Managing Director of Horus Music, Nick Dunn, adds: We’re very happy to see that more and more companies are realising that there are opportunities for business, especially in the music industry, that are available outside of London and have the additional benefit of being both financially and environmentally friendly. We welcome PPL and PRS for Music to such a diverse and growing city.”

    Everyone at Horus Music looks forward to many more years of a successful partnership with both of these companies and hope that our relationship with grow even further as we work together in the city of Leicester to help the musicians, songwriters and record labels of Leicestershire and beyond.

  3. How Publishing Works – Contracts and Rights Explained

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    How Publishing Works

    How Publishing Works

    Publishing can be a very tricky area of the music industry to understand. As if the concept of what publishing is wasn’t difficult enough, there are a huge number of acronyms and organisations to remember. Luckily we are here to help make sense of it all for you.

    Music publishers are essentially the people who administer the rights for songwriters and composers on a piece of music. When a song is created there can often be songwriters consulted who are not members of the band or performing act. In order to make sure they receive royalties for their work, a song is split into two different parts when dealing with rights. Publishers deal with the rights for the composition of the song and the written work, whereas labels typically deal with the recording of the song as a different component (often known as the master).

    When signing to a publisher in the UK, they will work together with the UK collection society called PRS (similar organisations exist in other countries under different names). The PRS is an organisation that represents songwriters, composers and publishers, collecting royalties on their behalf whenever their music is performed publicly. This can be when the song is played live, on TV, radio or in public places like retail shops.

    As if the split between recording and composition wasn’t confusing enough, there are also a few types of income streams with publishing. These are:

    • Performing Rights.
    • Mechanical Income.
    • Synchronisation.
    • Print Rights.

    Check out this post for more information on what these rights mean.

    Publishing Contracts

    When singing a publishing deal there are a few different kinds of typical scenarios you can expect:

    Single Song Assignment - Also referred to as a specific agreement. This is where the publisher will only publish individual songs and the songwriter is not exclusively signed to them. They can enter into as many single song agreements as they wish. The agreement is also made for a specific period of time.

    Exclusive Writer Contract - This type of deal is more serious and is worth seeking legal advice for before signing. The entire catalogue of the writer is covered by this agreement and could include a recoupable advance for the writer. Make sure to look at the length of the agreement, the territories involved and the royalty split when signing this agreement.

    Administration - This is a different kind of contract where the writer does not sign any publishing rights away, and does not involve any creative endeavours such as sync opportunities. Instead this brings in a third party to handle the administrative work of publishing, such as collecting foreign income through sub-publishers in other territories. The administrator will take a percentage of the royalties for this work.

    Sub-publishing Agreement - This is a deal that publishers make with other publishers and is generally done without the involving the writer. If a publisher feels that the writers work would be better represented in another territory by a different publisher, they will write a sub-publisher agreement to do this. For example, if a publisher in England would like to publish in America they may find an American publisher to work with.  The advantages of this are that that publisher could be an expert in their territory and have good contacts. Royalties would also flow quicker as that publisher can collect more easily for their territory. The disadvantages of this however is that there are more parties taking a cut of royalties before they reach the writer, and  when new developments occur for the writer it can take a long time to update each and every publisher about what is going on.

    Synchronisation - This contract can be made to either a publisher or a specialised sync company. This deal solely covers trying to license music for sync and collecting money from that. Typically there is a 50/50 royalty split between the writer and sync company but this can vary. Specialised companies tend to have better contacts in TV and film companies, but it is worth looking at what successful placements they have done in the past.

    Overall publishing can create a great source of income for artists aside from regular sales of music. It also means you are not missing out on royalties you are potentially owed and creates great exposure opportunities through sync placements. Hopefully this helps you to understand a little more about publishing and what its place is within the music world.