Tag Archive: UK Music

  1. Horus Music Wins Queen’s Award for Enterprise

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    Horus Music wins Queen's Award

    We are delighted to announce that Horus Music has been awarded the Queen’s Award for Enterprise for International Trade.

    Established in 2006, Horus Music is a global music distribution and label services company. Having initially focused on management they now offer musicians a simple and affordable solution to distribute their music and videos. Horus Music now works with over 800 music download and streaming platforms in order to provide as many opportunities as possible for musicians to earn an income from their music, while retaining full control and ownership of their music at all times.

    The company works closely with their clients to empower them with the knowledge and opportunities they need to maximise the value of their music. Horus Music is dedicated to not only  working with one multi-national company but also has partnerships with smaller, more local platforms too. Beyond this, they have opened up more possibilities for their clients by allowing them to infiltrate into massive markets with untapped potential. Within the last three years, Horus Music’s overseas sales have grown by over 180% and staff numbers have tripled.

    On hearing the news, CEO Nick Dunn added: “We are absolutely overjoyed at being recognised by Her Majesty The Queen for outstanding growth in international trade. As a company that has been built without investment from outside sources, along with the hard work and dedication of our team, this award celebrates all that we have achieved. Over the course of our history, we have diligently built an extensive network that allows everybody to achieve and to reach audiences around the world that they wouldn’t ordinarily be able to access. This awards puts us among a small group of companies within the UK to be awarded Britain’s most coveted commercial prize.”

    Director of Horus Music, Nina Condron stated: “The multiculturalism of Leicester has inspired us to ensure that Horus Music doesn’t have solely a western focus, unlike other companies. Our independent spirit motivates us to  provide each of our clients with equal opportunities for distribution and marketing.”

    Having recently opened another office in India designed to improve access to localised platforms and to offer a more personalised service to local musicians, Horus Music is already looking to do the same in even more territories.

    Ian Harrison, Director of Exports in the Midlands for the Department of International Trade said, “We are thrilled to hear that Horus Music has received the Queen’s Award for Enterprise in the International Trade category. This is richly deserved for a company that was incorporated as recently as 2006 but has grown sales both domestically and overseas year on year since then. With a commitment to put the musicians it serves at the heart of its strategy, we wish Horus Music every success in the coming years and will be delighted to continue our close working relationship with the company.”

    Emmy Buckingham, International + Membership Manager for AIM said, “AIM is committed to helping our members’ export activities and Horus Music are a brilliant example of a UK music company maximising their international opportunities to the full extent. Congratulations on receiving the Queen’s Award for Enterprise.”

    Geoff Taylor, Chief Executive BPI & BRIT Awards, said “We’re delighted that our member Horus Music has been honoured with the prestigious Queen’s Award for Enterprise for International Trade. We congratulate Nick Dunn and his team on their singular achievement and on this deserved acknowledgment of their success, recognising that small and independent music companies like Horus Music play their full part in underpinning the appeal of British music around the world, and in driving the UK’s global music exports.”

    Horus Music Ltd. wins the Queen’s Award for International Trade for Outstanding Short Term Growth.

  2. A New Festival is Coming to Town

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    TDM Festival

    A new festival is taking over Leicester and it’s ready to blow everyone away. This new festival goes by the name TDM (which stands for Truly Diverse Music) and it’s allows you to be introduced to world music and to celebrate it all at once.

    The festival is taking place inside the Cultural Quarter in Leicester from 26th-28th of May 2017. The first set of tickets are going on sale on Friday 3rd March 2017.

    History

    The festival is a great way to hear new music and celebrate something that is Leicester born and bred. The origins of the festival stem from when the TDM coordinator was studying at the De Montfort University and put together a world music event with fellow students, which had the name Tour De Music (TDM). This inspired the coordinator to keep doing this after graduation.

    TDM Festival, is powered by Horus Music.

    Venues

    Tickets will be released on Friday 3rd March for 5 of the festival events, to be held across 3 venues. 4 of the events will be hosted by The Exchange and Manhattan34 who will run events back to back across Saturday and Sunday. The 5th event that is hosted by The Peepul Centre, who will close the festival with an India focused event. This is to celebrate the 70th year of independence for India.

    More venues and events will be added at a later date, along with line-up announcements through the month of March.

    Variety of Genres

    What is so special about this festival, is that it isn’t bound to just one genre. The line-up will have a variety of genres such as brass band, reggae, hip-hop, electronic, rock and so much more.

     

    Tickets

    Tickets are out now and are available here http://tdmfestival.seetickets.com/tour/tdm-festival

    For more information and news, you can take a look at the following links:

  3. An Introduction to the Music Industry – Part 2

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    Catch up on part 1 here and find out how you can make money from the rights you own.

    An Introduction to the Music Industry - Part 2

    Live Performance

    Unlike copyright, which can be harder to understand, the are two other forms of revenue streams that artists will use. These two forms of making money are Live Performance and Fan Relationship.

    To make money from Live Performance is to simply monetise live performances in front of people. However, ticket income is not the only stream of revenue within the live performance setting, for instance money can be made from:

    • Tickets
    • Ticket commissions
    • Ticket resale mark-ups
    • Food and drink
    • Other services – i.e. cloak room, parking, VIP.
    • Sponsorships – the live sector has the most revenue wth brands (i.e. O2, branded beers at gigs).

    As a an artist’s fan base grows and have greater success and exposure, the live setting will change (naturally getting bigger). Here are the steps that most artists and bands traditionally follow as their live setting changes:

    1. Self promoted gigs, pay to play.
    2. ‘Gig’ or ‘Club’ nights, festival new bands stages.
    3. Club and pub venue touring, festival stages.
    4. Theatre venue, festival main stages – this is the stage where artists will start to make ‘real’ money.
    5. Arena touring, potentially headline slots at festivals
    6. Stadium touring, headlining festivals.

    Fan Relationship

    In the digital age, as record sales diminish and the popularity of streaming services have drastically increased, using a fanbase as a source of revenue has become a major focus for new bands and artists. With the use of social media, artists now have a way of communicating with their fanbase and to get to know them better. This means that artists can find out what the core fans want, and consequently, can find out what to sell to them.

    As an artist, once you have an engaged, growing fanbase, you can start to sell them products and services, such as:

    • A subscription service (i.e. an online fan club)
    • Signed records
    • Deluxe records (with extra content such as, B-sides, demos, acoustic versions etc.)
    • Premium merchandise

    Using the combination of you (the artist), your music and your live shows, you can sell content, experiences and a relationship to your fanbase. In addition, if a sizeable fanbase is created, brands and companies may want to start a partnership with the artistic order to reach that audience, as well as exposing you to their customers.

    These three revenue streams are all built on and rely upon building a group of core fans. To provide them with content, different experiences and an ongoing, engaging relationship, artists will usually have to depend on creating partnerships with other roles within the music industry.